2017 QC Affiliates Postering Session

Tuesday, April 11 1:30-3:00 Minor Hall Conference Room Economics: Ben Leyden, Jorge Miranda, Jining Zhong, Cailin Slattery Statistics: Maria Tackett, Bo Yang Sociology: Candace Miller, Sarah Johnson, Colin Arnold Politics: Aycan Katitas, Thomas Gray, Carl Huang, and Bob Kubinec Music: Ryan Maguire

Jonathan Eggleston

Jonathan Eggleston: Does Encouraging Record Use for Financial Assets Improve Data Accuracy? Evidence from Administrative Data

Jonathan Eggleston, Economist at the U.S. Census Bureau Friday, April 21st 12-1pm 398 New Cabell Hall Lunch Does Encouraging Record Use for Financial Assets Improve Data Accuracy? Evidence from Administrative Data Abstract Many surveys ask respondents to look at financial records in order to improve data accuracy. However, the assumption that record use reduces measurement error…

Todd Sechser

Todd Sechser–Violence, Gender, and Pro-Social Behavior: Evidence from the Laboratory

Wednesday, April 19 12:00PM-1:00PM Nau Hall, Room 342 Abstract How does wartime violence shape post-war social cohesion?  Existing research offers mixed answers.  Some field experiments suggest that individuals who have witnessed political violence in the past are more likely to engage in pro-social behavior.  By contrast, research in psychology has found that witnessing violence leads to aggressive and…

Thomas Guterbock Named 2017 John M. Kennedy Achievement Award Recipient

Thomas Guterbock, Director of the Center for Survey Research at the University of Virginia, has been named the 2017 recipient of the John M. Kennedy Achievement Award, given by the Association of Academic Survey Research Organizations (AASRO) for his service and leadership to academic survey research. As founding Director of the University of Virginia’s Center…

Connie Schibber

Constanza Figueroa Schibber

Are Legislative Majorities Successful in Translating their Policy Preferences into Policy Outcomes? A Bayesian Cross-National Analysis Wednesday, March 15 12:00PM-1:00PM Nau Hall Room 342 Abstract: In separation of powers systems, in theory, legislative and executive branches must concur for policies to be enacted. However, empirical research, especially on Latin American cases, suggests that rather than…

Thad Dunning

Thad Dunning, Research Talk: Is Paying Taxes Habit Forming? Theory and Evidence from Uruguay

Tuesday, April 4, 12:30PM-1:30PM (specialized talk) Bryan Hall, Room 229 (English Faculty Lounge) Abstract Citizens can develop persistent, self-reinforcing habits of interaction with tax bureaucracies and other organs of the state. Yet, policy interventions can also foster or disrupt habits, often with unanticipated consequences. We study a policy in Montevideo, Uruguay that randomly assigns tax…

Thad Dunning

Thad Dunning Public Talk: Experiments, External Validity, and Cumulative Learning: the EGAP Metaketa Approach

Tuesday, April 4, 4:00PM-5:00PM (general talk) Wilson Hall, Room 402 Abstract Scholars have rightly emphasized the difficulty of accumulating knowledge from distinct experimental studies. In addition to problems such as non-transparent reporting and publication bias, differences in interventions, outcomes, and context can make it difficult to discern what drives contrasting findings. Unplanned replication has difficultly…

Sally Hudson

Sally Hudson of the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy

Thursday, March 23 12:30PM-1:30PM Sally Hudson of the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy Nau Hall, Room 342 Abstract Randomized evaluations show that Teach for America (TFA) teachers outperform colleagues in boosting achievement at hard-to-staff schools. Despite this cross-sectional evidence, TFA’s long-run effects remain unknown, a key concern for policymakers. High turnover among…